Tag Archives: Mobility

What’s your reaction to the #YearOfMobility?

mobilityatx_colorMobility ATX just posted the #YearOfMobility section of the State of our City address. I love Mobility ATX. It’s like Reddit for Austin public policy nerds, and it encourages productive discussion which is exactly what we need to have right now. As I said in the speech on Tuesday, we need to do big things on I-35, transit, bikes and rail, or we’re just going to end up like Los Angeles. (In fact, traffic on I-35 has gotten so bad that people in Houston feel sorry for us now.) And while work is ongoing on sidewalks, street lights, and crossing signals, we need to get a lot of public input now before we consider what projects we put before the voters as soon as November. So read up and spout off.

 

 

 

Great Cities Do Big Things: The State of our City Roundup

“We are the city of the future, but what future will that be? If we do not do big things now, we will end up with the housing costs of San Francisco and the traffic congestion of Los Angeles.” -Mayor Adler

If you weren’t able to join us at the Topfer Theatre last night for the State of our City address (or watch it live on ATXN) — or if you want to catch up on what people are saying about it — you’re in luck. Consider this page your online library for all of your State of our City needs.

Read all about it after the break.

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“Great Cities Do Big Things” – State of Our City Feb. 16, 2016 Austin, Texas

“Great cities do big things not because they are great. Cities become great because they do big things.”

Thank you, President Fenves. I am grateful for your leadership at the University of Texas and for our growing working relationship and even friendship.

And with the conversations that need to be happening between UT and the City on issues like the development of the Innovation Zone around our new medical school, a replacement arena for the Drum, the future of the MUNY golf course site, as well as expanding opportunities for closer connection between Austin and the incredible intellectual resources of your faculty, there’s a lot for you and me — and the community — to be talking about.

And by the way, I’m grateful to you for skipping the West Virginia game tonight. You get pretty good seats, so I know what kind of sacrifice this is.

President Fenves recounted the story of the Austin Dam. I love that story, because as the Mayor of Austin I’m often asked what the secret sauce is that makes us a magical city and a center for innovation and creativity. Most every other city wishes it could replicate our success. When I attended the climate change talks in Paris, the 100 Resilient Cities meeting in London, the Almedalen Political Rhetoric Festival in Norway, and the traffic control center in Dublin, Ireland, and people found out that I was the Mayor they’d get a big smile on their face and tell me how much they love Austin.

Cities from all over our country and the rest of the world send entire delegations here to troop through our offices in hopes of finding the magic formula written on a white board somewhere.  These leaders from other cities ask me what makes Austin so special. I tell them about Barton Springs and how our commitment to our environment became perhaps our most important asset. I tell them about Willie Nelson and our live music, how by embracing diverse cultures we established an inclusive community where creativity thrives, about a community where it is okay to fail so long as you learn and grow. And I tell them about Michael Dell reinventing the assembly line in his dorm room and how coming up with radical new ideas here doesn’t make you an outcast — it can make you rich and famous.

And then I tell them about the Austin Dam, and how when the dam burst we were set on a path that turned us into a boomtown of the Information Age. The lesson, I tell these visitors from other cities is clear. They need to leave Austin, return to their hometowns, and destroy all their dams and bridges, too.

But some cities just aren’t willing to do the Big Things.

Continue reading after the break.

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Our Big Accomplishments of 2015

In our first year under the new 10-1 form of government, your Austin City Council set high goals for what we could accomplish in the first year. We are proud to have made real progress toward improving Austin for everyone. We’re looking forward to an even more productive 2016.

See the full list here.

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NEWS: Mayor Adler to attend Harvard Conference for Newly Elected Mayors

This week Austin Mayor Steve Adler will join newly elected mayors and mayors-elect from across the country at Harvard Institute of Politics’ (IOP) upcoming Seminar on Transition and Leadership for Newly Elected Mayors. Every two years, the IOP hosts the country’s leading ‎educational and preparatory program for new U.S. mayors.

Newly elected mayors from large cities will gather Dec. 8-11 for the IOP’s conference on exercising leadership in City Hall and addressing legislative and policy challenges. The program, co-sponsored by the U.S. Conference of Mayors, has hosted hundreds of current and former mayors since its inception in 1975. The Institute primarily invites newly-elected mayors from cities with populations over 75,000.

“Austin is not the first city to deal with mobility and affordability challenges. This conference is a great opportunity for me to learn what has worked – and not worked – in other cities,” said Mayor Adler. “As much as Austin is an example to other cities across the world about fostering innovation in technology, culture, and renewable energy, I’m always in the market for new ideas that we can put to good use in Austin.”

“We gladly welcome newly elected U.S. mayors to Harvard,” said Christian Flynn, Harvard IOP Director of Conferences and Special Projects. “Our seminar provides an opportunity for new city leaders to gain critical guidance from experts, practitioners and each other.”

The 21st biennial Seminar on Transition and Leadership for Newly Elected Mayors features a diverse group of policy and political experts. The seminar begins Tuesday, December 8, concluding Friday, December 11 at the IOP at the John F. Kennedy School of Government. The newly elected U.S. mayors will participate in a variety of sessions led by current and former U.S. mayors, academics, policy analysts and practitioners. Topics will include Move: Putting America’s Infrastructure Back in the Lead, Policing and Public Safety, Communicating in Real-Time During a Crisis as well as workshops on transitioning from the campaign to City Hall, finance and administration, economic development and competitiveness, the tech and data-driven city and attracting the Millennial generation to cities.

For questions and media requests, please contact Jason Stanford, Communications Director, Office of Mayor Steve Adler, (512) 978-2153 office, (512) 619-5756 cell.